5332 Private John Barnes Evans KIA
20th Infantry Battalion, 5th Infantry Brigade, 2nd Division
1st Australian Imperial Force 1914-1919

Introduction

Image if available

The following information and chronological table are a summary of the entries from the World War One service record of John Barnes Evans.

Note that some of the service record pages are duplicated - presumably when the unit and Army records were amalgamated on discharge.

Service numbers were allocated by unit, and are not unique to the individual.

Prepared for Margaret Anne Wine, great-niece of John Evans by Clive Mitchell-Taylor - 30 Jun 2018.

View John Evans' Service record
View the Commonwealth War Graves Entry located at the Villers-Bretonneux Memorial, Index No M.R.26 Part II https://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/1460416/evans,-john-barnes/


Enlistment Details

Service Number

5332

Name

John Barnes Evans

Born at

Corryong, Parish of Corryong, County of Benambra, Victoria

Age

32 years 6 months as at 13 March 1916 (Birth dates not recorded, only age on enlistment)

Trade or Calling

Fitter

Marital Status

Married

Next of Kin

Wife - Audrey Valetta Grace Evans
Cravensville via Tallangatta, Victoria
Later amended to "Berringama"

Previous Military Service

No

Attested at

Royal Agricultural Show Grounds, NSW

Date of Enlistment

13 Mar 1916

Height

5 foot 4 inches [162.5 cm]

Weight

130 pounds [59.1 Kg]

Chest

34-37½ inches [86.3 cm - 95.2 cm]

Eyes

Hazel

Hair

Brown

Religious Denomination

Methodist

Units

20th Battalion, 5th Brigade


Chronological Events

Rank

Description

Date

Remarks

Private

Enlisted

23 Mar 1915

Private

Assigned to C Company at Dubbo

24 Mar 1916

Private

Asigned to A Company 20th Battalion

18 Apr 1916

Private

Embarked on HMAT "WILTSHIRE (A18) for overseas

22 Aug 1916

Private

Disembarked Plymouth

13 Oct 1916

Private

Taken on Strength No 3 Command Depot, Woolwich

13 Oct 1916

Private

Marched out to 5th Training Battalion

4 Nov 1916

Private

Marched in to 5th Training Battalion

4 Nov 1916

 

Private

Proceeded overseas France from Folkestone, per "PRINCESS CLEMENTINE"

17 Jan 1917

Private

Marched in from England to 2nd Australian Division Base Depot (2 ADBD), Etaples, France

17 Jan 1917

Private

To Segregation Camp [Nature of illnesss not noted]

12 Feb 1917

Private

Marched out to 2 ADBD

3 Mar 1917

Private

Marched out to Unit from 2 ADBD

3 Mar 1917

Private

Taken on Strength 20th Battalion from 14th Reinforcements

13 Mar 1917

Private

Killed in Action

15 Apr 1917

After having been in the Battalion for 33 days

Private

Daily Statement (Military) awards, from 9 July 1917:
10/- per fortnight to daughter Eileen Valetta M. Barnes [sic] with Audrey V. G. Barnes as trustee
£2 per fortnight to widow Audrey Violetta Grace Evans, and 15/- per fortnight to son Victor Henry Evans

9 Aug 1917

Note error in daughter's surname.

Private

AIF Kit Store records effects of Pte JB Evans being shipped to Mrs A.V.G. Evans per "EURIPEDES":
Wristlet watch and Strap, Money Belt, Purse, 2 Pencil Cases (Metal), Steel Mirror, Diary, Leather Watch Box, Key, Testament, Note Book, Letter, 2 Badges, Pair of Scissors, 50 Centimes Note (Damaged),3 Coins, Souvenir Coin.

Undated

 

Private

Base Records Office, Victoria Barracks Melbourne forwards effects to Audrey Barnes

31 Oct 1917

Private

Effects received and consignment note signed by AUdrey V.G. Evans.

Dec 1917

 


Medals awarded

British War Medal 1914-1920
Victory Medal

Rising Sun Badge - 1st and 2nd AIF

World War One medal set


L to R - 1914-15 Star, War Medal 1914-1920, Victory Medal

Unit Shoulder Patch
20th Infantry Battalion
20<sup>th</sup> Battalion Should Patch

Not entitled to wear
ANZAC 'A' on Shoulder Patch
ANZAC A

Background - Infantry Battalions

The 1914 infantry battalion was a large unit, composed of eight rifle companies each of 3 officers and 116 other ranks armed with Short Magazine Lee-Enfield .303 rifles, a   small headquarters with 4 officers and 21 other ranks and a machine gun section with two .303 Maxim machine guns, one officer and 17 other ranks, a total of 32 officers and 991 other ranks. In December 1914, battalions were reorganised into four companies each of four platoons, but strength was unchanged. By mid 1918, the number of officers had increased to 38 but the number of other ranks had declined to 900. At the same time, the firepower of the battalion was greatly augmented with hand and rifle grenades and Lewis Guns, of which there was 34 per battalion.

20th Battalion, 5th Brigade, 2nd Divison


[Information from https://rslvirtualwarmemorial.org.au]

The 20th Battalion was raised at Liverpool in New South Wales in March 1915 as part of the 5th Brigade. A sprinkling of the 20th's original recruits had already served with the Australian Naval and Military Expeditionary Force (AN&MEF) in the operations to capture German New Guinea in 1914. The 20th left Australia in late June, trained in Egypt from late July until mid-August, and on 22 August landed at ANZAC Cove.

Arriving at Gallipoli just as the August offensive petered out, the 20th's role there was purely defensive. From 26 August, until its withdrawal from the peninsula on 20 December, the 20th Battalion was responsible for the defence of Russell's Top.

After further training in Egypt, the 20th Battalion proceeded to France. It entered the trenches of the Western Front for the first time in April 1916 and in the following month had the dubious honour of being the first Australian battalion to be raided by the Germans. The 20th took part in its first major offensive around Pozieres between late July and the end of August 1916. After a spell in a quieter sector of the front in Belgium, the 2nd Division, which included the5th Brigade, came south again in October. The 20th Battalion provided reinforcements for the attack near Flers between 14 and 16 November, launched in conditions that Charles Bean described as the worst ever encountered by the AIF.

In 1917, the 20th was involved in the follow-up of German forces after their retreat to the Hindenburg Line, and was one of four battalions to defeat a counter- stroke by a German force, almost five times as strong, at Lagnicourt. The Battalion took part in three major battles before the year was out, second Bullecourt (3-4 May) in France, and Menin Road (20-22 September) and Poelcappelle (9-10 October) in Belgium.

The spring of 1918 brought a major German offensive. The 20th Battalion was one of many Australian battalions rushed to stop it, and it encountered some particularly severe fighting when ordered to attack at Hangard Wood on 7 April. With the German Army's last desperate offensive defeated, the 20th participated in the battles that pushed it ever closer to defeat: Amiens on 8 August, the legendary attack on Mont St Quentin on 31 August, and the forcing of the Beaurevoir Line around Montbrehain on 3 October. Montbrehain was the battalion's last battle of the war. It was disbanded on 20 April 1919.

Battle Honours:

Somme 1916-18, Pozieres, Bapaume 1917, Bullecourt, Ypres 1917, Menin Road, Polygon Wood, Broodeseinde, Poelcappelle, Passchendaele, Hamel, Amiens, Albert 1918, Mont St Quentin, Hindenburg Line, Beaurevoir, France and Flanders 1916-18, Suvla, Gallipoli 1915, Egypt 1915-16

The ANZAC 'A'

The brass letter 'A' to represent service related to Gallipoli (ANZAC) was authorised to be worn 'over unit colour patches on both sleeves of the service dress jacket and greatcoat" by Military Order 354 of 18 Aug 17 and AIF Order 937 of 6 Nov 17, as amended in terms of qualification by Military Order 20 of 19 Jan 18 and by AIF Order 1084 of 25 Jan 18.

The size of the letter 'A', introduced as one inch in height (AIF Order 994 of 30 Nov 17), was reduced to three-quarters of an inch by AIF Order 1012 of 11 Dec 17.

Provision for wearing the brass letter 'A' was also included in General Routine Order 0.815 of 17 Dec 43 and GRO 310 of 7 Dec 45.

ANZAC 'A'

Wound Stripe

Army Order No.204 Headquarters, 1st A.N.Z.A.C., 9th August, 1916. (slightly amended for layout)
DISTINCTIONS FOR OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS WHO HAVE BEEN WOUNDED

The following distinction in dress will be worn on the service dress jacket by all officers and soldiers who have been wounded in any of the campaigns since 4th August 1914 :

  • Stripes of gold Russia braid No.1, two inches [2.5cm] in length sewn perpendicularly on the left forearm sleeve of the jacket to mark each occasion on which wounded.

  • In the case of officers, the lower end of the first strip of gold braid will be immediately above the upper point of the flap on the cuff.

  • Warrant officers, non-commissioned officers and men will wear the gold braid on the left forearm sleeve, the lower edge of the braid to be three inches from the bottom of the sleeve.

  • Subsequent occasions on which wounded, will be placed on either side of the original one at half inch interval.

  • Gold braid and sews will be obtained free on indent from the Army Ordnance Department; the sewing on will be carried out regimentally without expense to the public.

Wound Stripes

Long Service Badges

A.I.F. ORDER No.470, 24 January 1917 (slightly amended for layout)

The question of the issue of a badge to members of the AIF who have completed a certain period of service has received consideration, and approval has been given for the issue of a badge for long service combined with good conduct, subject to the following conditions.

  • The badge will consist of an inverted single chevron of service braid to be worn on the left forearm - the point of the chevron to be 3 inches [7.6cm] above the edge of the cuff.

  • Warrant and non-commissioned officers and men, will be eligible for the badge, which will not carry an increased pay or allowance.

  • One chevron will be worn for each complete year's service in the Australian Imperial Force from the date of embarkation in Australia

  • No badge will be issued to any man who, during the 12 months, has incurred a regimental entry (i.e. an entry involving forfeiture of pay) in his sheet.

  • Time absent from the unit in hospital or elsewhere on account of wounds or sickness, not the result of misconduct, will count as service towards earning the badge.

  • A man in possession of a badge will forfeit same on being convicted of any offence involving a forfeiture of pay , but will be eligible to regain the badge after 6 months good conduct, from the date of forfeiture.

  • The illegal wearing of this badge will be a crime under A.A. Section 40.

Long Service Badges

Overseas Service Chevrons

Australian Imperial Force Order No.1053, January 1918 (Slightly amended for layout)

His Majesty the King has been graciously pleased to approve of the award of chevrons to denote service overseas since the 4th August 1914.

  • Chevrons of two colours have been approved.

    • The first chevron if earned on or before 31st December 1914, will be red.

    • If earned on or after 1st January 1915, it will be blue.

    • All additional chevrons after the first will be blue.

  • The chevrons will be worsted embroidery, 1/4 inch [0.63cm] in width, the arms 4 inches [10.2cm] long. They will be worn inverted on the right forearm:

  • In the case of officers, the apex of the lowest chevron will be 1 inch [2.5cm] above the upper point of the flap on the cuff.

  • In the case of warrant-officers, non-commissioned officers and men, the apex of the lowest chevron will be midway between the seams and four inches [10.2cm] above the bottom edge of the sleeve.

  • The red chevron will be worn below the blue one. They will not be worn on greatcoats.

  • In the case of Australians, the first chevron was earned the date the individual left Australia. Additional chevrons were awarded for each successive aggregate period of 12 months service outside Australia.

[http://au.geocities.com/fortysecondbattalion/level2/reference/01nos-standards.htm]

Overseas Service Chevrons