NX91711 Gunner Charles Roy Wine
2/17 Light Anti-Aircraft Battery (Airborne)
New Guinea Theatre
2nd Australian Imperial Force
1939 -1946

This file last updated 21 October, 2023 10:36







Introduction

Charles Roy Wine was born 9 Mar 1903 in AUKLAND, NEW ZEALAND, the 9th of 12 children of William Thomas Wine and Henrietta Harriet Heuschkel. His parents had strong family connections in NEW ZEALAND, moving between AUKLAND and SYDNEY quite often for extended periods and four of their 11 children are born in NEW ZEALAND. William's brother Alfred James Senior and wife Catherine Barry lived in NEW ZEALAND and also had 11 children.

A mechanic, Charles marries Beryl Constance Smedley in 1927 and they have two boys, Andrew Charles Alfred Wine born in 1929 and Donald Arthur Wine in 1934. Both later serve in the Australian Army. See sidebar below

Beryl Wine, Andrew Wine standing, Donald Wine, Charles Roy Wine
Beryl Wine, Andrew Wine (standing), Donald Wine, Charles Wine

Charles enlists in the Army on 9 Mar 1942 at the age of 39 and is initially allotted as an infantry reinforcement, but three weeks later is appointed to the Artillery Corps for basic training and then to the 17th Light Anti-Aircraft Battery.

The Japanese advance through Thailand and Malaya, culminating in the fall of Singapore triggers an Australian push to enlist men into the Army and Air Force. The outcome of this haste can be seen in records missing certain classes of information, or where the forms exist, missing occurences which would normally be recorded. For example there is no record of his enlistment medical.

Gnr Wine serves for 592 days in NEW GUINEA, and is definitely deployed to PORT MORESBY, MILNE BAY, WANAGELA and BUNA with "HAIR OIL FORCE", but because his gun battery was deployed piecemeal by sections of three guns each, it is uncertain whether he also served at GOODENOUGH ISLAND, PORLOCK HARBOUR, DOBEDURA or ORO BAY. All of these places are the battle honours of his unit.

The following are links to his official documents:

This record compiled by Clive Mitchell-Taylor for the members of the Wine family, Andrew, Audrey (née Lewis) and their children Margaret and Clive Mitchell-Taylor, Gregory (deceased) Christopher, Peter and Rita (née Mollo), Ruth Halliday (née Wine), Therese and Michelle Melrose.

Abbreviations and Acronyms

Abbreviations or acronyms which have a dotted underline can be expanded by moving the cursor over the term - e.g. WIA. The cursor will be replaced by ? and the expanded abbreviation will be displayed. This is gradually being incorporated into the site, replacing the the current expansion of abbreviations. There may be a discernable delay of about a second before the expansion is first provided.

There is also a separate list of abbreviations which is available through the menu at the top of this page or the hyperlink here.  Abbreviations are inconsistent, even within a single occurence where a term is abbreviated.

There are a number of sources for tracing abbreviations used in Australian and New Zealand service records. Those used when operating with the British or US forces can generally be found, especially in World War 1. Abbreviations used solely within Australia in WW2 are most difficult to trace, particularly when they are regional. Sometimes a 'best guess' is the only answer.

Duplicated Pages

Some of the service information may appear to be duplicated although individual occurrences are not in the same order and different abbreviations used. This occurs when the unit and Army records are amalgamated upon discharge or death in Service.

Service Numbers

Service numbers in WW1 were unique to the unit (e.g. Battalion) or Corps (e.g. Artillery). In WW2 Service Numbers were unique to the State in which they were allotted. For further information about identity numbers for Service personnel, see Regimental and Service Numbers

Dates of Occurrence and Reporting

The date of reporting an incident may be hours, days or months after the date on which incident actually occurred.

The original service record is amended only when the incident is reported which means that events are not necessarily recorded in in strict chronological sequence. This is the date shown on the left of the page of the original record, and also on the left in my transcription but readers should note that at times there may be no date of reporting at all, particularly when service personel are repatriated for discharge at the end of hostilities.

To assist the reader, when transcribing the military record I have done my best to record events in their chronological sequence. This is date is on the right of the page of the original record and also on the right in my transcription.

For clarity I have transcribed all dates into the format d MMM yyyy.

X List

Both WW1 and WW2 Australian Army personnel records mark the temporary absence of an individual from their parent unit by marking them 'X' in the unit roll.

An "X-List" is therefore a list of personnel who are detached from that parent unit.

The consequence of that X is that the parent unit is not not entitled to draw rations for that individual. The unit where the individual is marked 'P', as being present, is entitled to draw rations for them.

In the case of key personnel the X may also trigger a temporary unit transfer or promotion to fill that establishment position. Reinforcements may also be required.

Entries such as "Evacuated", "Discharged" or "Transferred" all trigger a corresponding entry of "Taken on Strength" at the receiving unit, while "Rejoined" or "Taken off X List" shows return to the parent unit.

This service biography prepared by Clive Mitchell Taylor, June 2022, for the grand-children of Charles Wine: Margaret Wine; Peter Wine; Ruth Halliday née Wine and Therese Wine.


Enlistment Details
Attestation Form Dated 9 Mar 1942

AUSTRALIAN MILITARY FORCES.


MOBILIZATION ATTESTATION FORM.


To be filled in for all Persons at the Place of Assembly when called out under Part III. or IV. of the Defence Act, or when voluntarily enlisted.



Army Number...................NX91711..................

Surname.................................WINE........................Other Names......................Charles Roy...................................................................

Unit...........................................................[in pencil]..........Inf Pool............................................................................................................

Enlisted for war service at............................RECRUITING DEPOT MARTIN PLACE......................................................................(Place)

................................................................(State)....................................9 Mar 1942...........................................................................(Date)


A.     Questions to be put to persons called out or presenting themselves for voluntary enlistment*

1.     What is your name?

1.     Surname          WINE
        Other Names   Charles Roy

2.     Where were you born?

2.     In or near the town of   Aukland   in the state or country of  New Zealand

3.     Are you a British Subject?

3.     Yes

4.     What is your age and date of birth

4.     Age                 39
        Date of Birth    5 Mar 1903

5.     What is your trade or occupation

5.     Mechanic

6.     Are you married, single or widower?

6.     Married - 2 children

7.     Have you previously served in any Armed Force either in peace or war? If so, where and in what arm?

7.     AMF               [Struck out]
        No ............................. Rank ............................ Unit ...................................
        OTHER MILITARY SERVICE
        No ............................. Rank ............................ Unit ...................................

8.     If now serving, give particulars

                         [Struck out]
8.        No ............................ Rank ............................ Unit ...................................

9.     Who is your actual next of kin? (Order of relationship.— wife, eldest son, eldest daughter, father, mother, eldest brother, eldest sister, eldest half-brother, eldest half-sister)

9.     Name              Mrs B.C. Wine     ["Beryl Constance" replaces initials]
        Relationship    Wife
        Address           3 Nelson Pde, Undercliff

10.     What is your permanent address?

10.     As above

11.      What is your religious denomination?
(Answer optional)

11.      Bapt

12.      Have you ever been convicted by a civil court?

12.     No

13.     Have you any of the following educational Qualifications? If so, which?

     1. Certficate for Entry to Secondary School
     2. Intermediate
     3. Leaving
     4. Leaving Honours     [No entries in any category]
     5. Technical
     6. University Degrees
     7. Other Diplomas



I, .....................Charles Roy Wine .......................................................................................................do solemnly declare that the
above answers made by me to the above questions are true.

Witnessed by ......................Walter Duncan....Lieut................................ ...................C.R. Wine...................................
                         (Signature of Attesting or Witnessing Officer)                                    (Signature)

* The person will be warned that should he give false answers to any of these questions he will be liable to heavy penalties under the Defence Act.


B

MEDICAL EXAMINATION

I certify the above-named person to be fit for Class............. I Fit..................

Temporarily unfit
Unfit

9 Mar 1942 .........................[Illegible].................(Signature)


C

OATH OF ENLISTMENT ‡

     I,.....................Charles Roy Wine ...............swear that I will well and truly serve our Sovereign Lord, the King, in the Military Forces of the Commonwealth of Australia until the cessation of the present time of war or until sooner lawfully discharged, dismissed, or removed, and that I will resist His Majesty's enemies and cause his Majesty's peace to be kept and maintained, and that I will in all matters appertaining to my service faithfully discharge my duty according to law.

SO HELP ME GOD!

Signature of Person Enlisted................. C.R. WINE .......................

Subscribed at ............................... Paddington .............................. in the State of ........................... N. S. W. .....................................

this ............................ 9 th ...................................... day of .......................................March .................................. 1942

        Before me—

    Signature of Attesting Officer ................................ E.H. Jackson Lieut ....................................................................................................

Persons who object to take an oath may make an affirmation in accordance with the Third Schedule of the Defence Act. In such cases the above form will be amended acccordingly and initialled by the Attesting Officer.


SERVICE AND CASUALTY FORM

Army No.

NX19711

Rank

Gnr

Christian Names

Charles Roy

Family Name

WINE

Unit

2/17 Lt A/A Bty

Trade or Occupation

Mechanic

Date of Enlistment

9 Mar 1942 (Mob 2 No 25602)

Marital Condition

Married

Place

Paddington NSW

Next of Kin

Mrs Beryl Constance Wine

Date of Birth

5 Mar 1903

Address of Next of Kin

3 Nelson Rd

Place of Birth

Aukland NZ

Undercliffe NSW

Religion

Bapt[ist]

Relationship

Wife

                                        Class I.
Medical Classification —
                                        Class II.
                    (On Enlistment)

Identification

Colour of Hair          Dark          Eyes          Brown
Distinctive Marks                [No entry]


Chronological Events
(Service and Casualty Form)

Date
Reported

Received
From

Event/Casualty

Medical     Other     Disciplinary

Date of
Occurence

Place of
Occurence

9 Mar 1942

Recruiting Depot

Enlisted

9 Mar 1942

NSW

10 Mar 1942

Gen Details Depot

Marched in to GDD

9 Mar 1942

SYDNEY

11 Mar 1942

GDD

Granted Spc leave w/o pay

11-16 Mar 1942

SYDNEY

30 Mar 1942

GDD

Marched out to A/A Trg Bty

18 Mar 1942

SYDNEY

23 Mar 1942

CO FLD TRNG REGT.

Taken on Strength [Unclear who approved LWOP]

23 Mar 1942

COWRA

23 Mar 1942

CO FLD TRNG REGT

Transferred to A/A Arty EC AMF

23 Mar 1942

COWRA

23 Mar 1942

A A Arty E.C.

Taken on strength ex 1 Field Trg Regt

23 Mar 1942

NSW

13 May 1942

AA Arty E.C

Transferred to 17 Lt A/A Bty AIF

4 May 1943

General Routine Orders

9 May 1942

17 Lt A/A Bty

Taken on Strength ex A A Arty AMF

4 May 1942

EC

5 June 1942

DRO

Entrained to Q'land LOC Area

5 May 1943

SYDNEY

19 May 1942

17 LA/A Bty

Embarked for 8 MD

19 May 1942

Q L of C Area

21 May 1942

17 LA/A Bty

Disembarked PORT MORESBY from 1 MD

21 May 1942

PORT MORESBY

2 Jan 1943

17 LA/A Bty

Attached to "HAIROIL FORCE" [MILNE BAY]

31 Dec 1942

PORT MORESBY

25 Mar 1943

17 LA/A Bty

Evac 10 Aust Field Amb (Malaria C) and tfd to X list

20 Feb 1943

New Guinea

25 Mar 1943

10 Fd Amb

Discharged 10 Aust Fd Amb to unit

4 Mar 1943

NEW GUINEA

6 Mar 1943

2/17 Lt A/A Bty

Taken on strength from 10 Aust Fd Amb

4 Mar 1943

NEW GUINEA

13 Jul 1943

2/17 Lt A/A Bty

Evacuated to 9 Aust Fd Amb ( (PUO)

28 Jun 1943

NEW GUINEA

13 Jul 1943

9 Fd Amb

Discharged 9 Fd Amb & returned to unit

1 Jul 1943

NEW GUINEA

3 Jul 1943

2/17 Lt A/A Bty

Rejoined unit from 9 Aust Fd Amb

1 Jul 1943

NEW GUINEA

11 Dec 1943

2/17 Aust Lt A/A Bty

Qualified for proficiency pay (1/277/44)

1 Jul 1943

NEW GUINEA

1 Jan 1944

[Illegible]

Embarked at Buna [aboard] "GORGON"

28 Dec 1943

NEW GUINEA

Disembarked at Townsville m/in 13 APSC (1/118/44)

31 Dec 1943

NEW GUINEA

2 Feb 1944

2/17 Lt A/A Bty

Marched in NSW L of C Area

5 Jan 1944

NSW

21 Mar 1944

116 AGH

Admitted 116 AGH [Illegible]

1 Mar 1944

NSW

21 Mar 1944

116 AGH

[Illegible]

8 Mar 1944

NSW

21 Mar 1944

68 ACH

Admitted [68 ACH was located at Ingleburn]

8 Mar 1944

NSW

15 Mar 1944

68 ACH

Malaria to 103 ACD[?]

15 Mar 1944

Dis[charged]

15 Mar 1944

103 ACD

Malaria BT ex 68 CH

30 Mar 1944

NSW

30 Mar 1944

103 ACD

Convalescent to GDD Dis[charged]

15 Mar 1944

NSW

1 Apr 1944

GDD

Marched in ex 103 ACD

30 Mar 1944

NSW

8 Apr 1944

2/17 Aust Lt A/A Bty

Rejoined ex GDD S/O X L:st

1 Apr 1944

NSW

25 Nov 1944

2/17 Aust Lt A/A Bty

Tfd to GDD for Discharge (MPR N12043)

24 Nov 1944

NSW

1 Dec 1944

HQ NSW L of C Area

DISCHARGED AMR&O 253 A(1)h, Auth[orised] AAAG(o) 28260 of 29 Nov 1944
BEING REQUIRED FOR EMPLOYMENT IN AN ESSENTIAL OCCUPATION

2 Dec 1944

NSW


Medals and Dress Embellishments

1939-1945 Star, Pacific Star, War Medal 1939-1945, and Australia Service Medal 1939-1945.

Use the hyperlinks or scroll down to see further information.


2/17 Australian Light Anti-Aircraft Battery (Airborne) - Independent

UNIT COLOUR PATCH


2/17 AUSTRALIAN LIGHT ANTI-AIRCRAFT BATTERY (AIRBORNE)

2/17 Australian Light Anti-Aircraft Battery (Airborne) Plaque at the
Australian War Memorial, CANBERRA

Formation

On 28 Jan 1942, Brigadier Keetings, Commandant Training Depots, instructs Lt P.B. Toose to proceed with the formation of a new unit to be called 17 Light Anti-Aircraft Battery, AIF, with Battery Headquarters (BHQ) and two troops to come from 2 MD and one troop from 3MD.

Establishment

On 6 Mar 1942 the Queensland at SANDGATE QLD reports a strength of 8 Officers and 271 Other Ranks. Mayfield reports a strength of 8 Officers and 276 Other Ranks on 15 Mar 1942, and this appears to be close to the War Establishment (WE) of the unit.

The main armamament of the battery was the 40mm Bofors anti-aircraft gun and in NEW GUINEA deployed 2 machine-guns, the magazine-fed .303 Bren light machine-gun with each gun. These were replaced in part at least with heavy machineguns as Vehicles included trucks and gun tractors as well as motorbikes.

The unit was commanded by a Major and comprised a headquarters, four gun troops (A,B,C,D), signals section, and workshop Section. Drivers, signallers, workshop personnel and cooks etc were allocated to the gun troops while deployed. Each Troop of 6 guns was commanded by a Lieutenant.

The light anti-aircraft batteries which were part of a regiment (i.e. not independent), had three troops, and as there is no detailed information for the independent batteries which have four troops, I have extrapolated from there.

As the unit is later deployed, variations are caused by deaths from enemy, illness or disease, hospitalisation from wounds,injuries and disease and detachments to other units.

History

The unit sailed from TOWNSVILLE on 19 May 1942 and disembarked PORT MORESBY on 1630 on 21 Mar 1942. It was then deployed to provide anti-aircraft cover for airfields in the PORT MORESBY area.

The establishment of a, [Artillery] Regimental Headquarters unburdens the independent Light AA Batteries of men and equipment, but hopefully provides leadership, guidance and coordination of the Artillery units in Papua New Guinea. In the short term though, the headquarters personnel, vehicles and other equipment were provided by the artillery units on loan.

The Wikipedia article on Ant-Aircraft defences of Australia during World War II notes that there were 16 Independent Light Anti-Aircraft Batteries equipped with 40mm Bofors and that those units in Papua New Guinea saw considerable action during the Battle for PORT MORESBY. It does not identify the batteries.

Colocation with US units in PORT MORSEBY led to the addition of "2/" before the battery number, in acknowledgement of the WW1 unit and the addition of "Australian" to the name. Over time, air movement of the Light Anti-Aircraft Batteries led to the unoffical but much prized suffix of "Airborne".

By October the operational tempo at MORESBY had slowed down and movement orders issued on 16 Oct 1942 required two troops of 2/17 LAA Bty to provide six 40mm Bofors with spare barrels,with two officers and 68 other ranks as well as three (later four) .50in air-cooled medium machineguns (MMG) with 18 other ranks for WANIGELA together with one water truck, two jeeps, one motorcycle, ten tons of ammunition and one ton of general stores. 2/9 Aust Ind LAA Bty was originally tasked with this movement but it was noted as an "error" and assigned to 2/17. B and C Troops embark and join HATFORCE at WANIGILA on 7 Nov 1942.

On 1 Jan 1943 Battery HQ and D Troop embarked from PORT MORESBY and was in place at MILNE BAY as a part of HAIROIL FORCE by 2 Jan 1943 and deployed there. On 5 Jan 1943, D Troop was deployed to BUNA. A and B Troops were deployed at HANSOM [A codename I have been unable to place with certainty], although the operational tempo saw troop movements intended to put much presssure on the northern coast of PNG, starting with WANIGILA and moving on to BUNA, GONA and SANANDA.

The code name HATFORCE, originally referring to Milne Bay was to be retained and its role was defined as:

  1. To exploit forward towards BUNA by sea and land;
  2. To develop and institute overland and small craft supply routes from WANIGILA to PONGANI. The overland route should be improved for supply dropping and movement of light motor transport to the extent possible.
  3. To secure WANIGILA as an air and sea base for supplies.

The war in the Pacific moved on and the unit was recalled to Australia in late Dec 1943 and disbanded in 1944. Charles Wine was discharged on 2 Dec 1944.


Battle Honours of the 2nd/17th Australian Light Anti-Aircraft Battery (Airborne)

Port Moresby, Milne Bay, Wanigela, Goodenough Island, Porlock Harbour, Dobedura, Oro Bay, Buna


Citizens Military Forces (CMF) Lapel Badge

CMF Badge

The Citizens Military Force badge was issued to those who were entitled from the latter part of World War 2 when members of the CMF, particularly the 11th Brigade were fighting on the Kokoda Trail [The place name gazetted by the Papua New Guinea Government], other locations in Papua New Guinea, Bougainville and the Pacific Island.


1939-1945 Star

1929-1945 Star

The 1939-45 Star is awarded for service between 3 September 1939 and 2 September 1945 for:

  • a period of six months (180 days) operational service for RAN and Army personnel and RAAF non-air crew personnel;
  • a period of two months operational service for air crew personnel; and/or
  • a period of six months service at sea for Merchant Navy provided at least one voyage was made through one of the specified areas of active operations;

The 1939-45 Star is awarded to Australian Civilian Personnel who served afloat with the United States Army Small Ships Section between 8 December 1941 and 2 September 1945. Eligibility is the same as that for Merchant Navy personnel. See required evidence to support a claim.

Design

The six–pointed star is yellow copper zinc alloy. The obverse has a central design of the Royal and Imperial cypher, surmounted by a crown. The cypher is surrounded by a circlet containing the words "The 1939-45 Star".

Stars issued to Australian personnel have recipient names engraved on the plain reverse.

Ribbon

The ribbon has three vertical stripes of dark blue, red and light blue. The dark blue stripe represents the Naval Forces and the Merchant Navy, the red stripe the Armies and the light blue stripe the Air Forces.

Clasps

The "BATTLE OF BRITAIN" clasp was awarded to eligible air crew involved in the Battle of Britain.

The "BOMBER COMMAND" clasp was introduced in 2012 and is awarded to eligible Bomber Command aircrew.

When the ribbon is worn alone the standard silver rosette ribbon emblem is worn to denote the award of a clasp. The silver rosette emblem is not supplied by the Directorate of Honours and Awards.


Pacific Star

The Pacific Star is awarded for entry into operational service in the Pacific Theatre of Operations between 8 December 1941 and 2 September 1945.

Navy and Merchant Navy personnel are eligible if the 1939-45 Star is earned by six months service or if they entered the Pacific Theatre between 2 March 1945 and 2 September 1945.

The Pacific Star is awarded to Australian Civilian Personnel who served afloat with the United States Army Small Ships Section. Eligibility is the same as that for Merchant Navy personnel. See required evidence to support a claim.

Design

The six–pointed star is yellow copper zinc alloy. The obverse has a central design of the Royal and Imperial cypher, surmounted by a crown. The cypher is surrounded by a circlet containing the words 'The Pacific Star'.

Stars issued to Australian personnel have recipient names engraved on the plain reverse.

Ribbon

The ribbon has central yellow and green stripes that represent the forests and the beaches of the Pacific, flanked dark blue, light blue and red stripes that represent the service of the Naval Forces and Merchant Navy, the Air Forces and the Armies.

Clasp

The Burma clasp was issued for the Pacific Star.

When the ribbon is worn alone a silver rosette ribbon emblem is worn to denote the award of a clasp.


War Medal 1939-1945

[Extract from Defence Honours and Awards website -Imperial Awards

The medal is cupro-nickel with the crowned effigy of King George VI on the obverse.

The reverse has a lion standing on a double-headed dragon. The top of the reverse shows the dates 1939 and 1945.

The rim is plain, and the medal hangs from a suspender. The ribbon colours of red, white and blue represent the colours of the Union Flag.

The War Medal 1939-45 was awarded for 28 days full-time service in the Armed Forces between 3 September 1939 and 2 September 1945. Operational and non-operational service may be counted, providing that it was of 28 days or more duration.

In the Merchant Navy there is a requirement that the 28 days should have been served at sea.

A member qualifies for the award where service was brought to an end by death, wounds or other disabilities due to service or by cessation of hostilities on 2 September 1945.

The War Medal 1939-45 is awarded to Australian Civilian Personnel who served afloat with the United States Army Small Ships Section between 8 December 1941 and 2 September 1945. Eligibility is the same as that for Merchant Navy personnel.


Australia Service Medal 1939-1945

[Extract from Defence Honours and Awards website - Imperial Awards

The medal is cupro-nickel with the crowned effigy of King George VI on the obverse.

The reverse has the Australian coat of arms, placed centrally, surrounded by the words "THE AUSTRALIA SERVICE MEDAL 1939-1945".

The rim is plain, and the medal hangs from a suspender.

The ribbon has a wide khaki central stripe, flanked by two narrow red stripes, which are in turn flanked by two outer stripes, one of dark blue and the other of light blue. The khaki represents the Australian Army, and the red, dark blue and light blue represent the Merchant Navy, Royal Australian Navy and the Royal Australian Air Force respectively.

The Australia Service Medal 1939-1945 was instituted in 1949 to recognise the service of members of the Australian Armed Forces and the Australian Mercantile Marine during World War II.

The medal was originally awarded to those who served at home or overseas for at least 18 month full-time service, or three years part-time service, between 3 September 1939 and 2 September 1945. Members of the Australian Mercantile Marine must have served the qualifying time at sea.

In 1996 the qualifying time was reduced to 30 days full-time or 90 days part-time service. To be eligible for the medal a serviceman or woman must have been honourably discharged from the Australian Armed Forces.


The Rising Sun Badge

This version of the Rising Sun Badge was worn by soldiers of the 1st and 2nd Australian Imperial Forces, and the badge has become an integral part of the Digger tradition.

Worn on the the upturned brim of the slouch hat, it is readily identified with the spirit of ANZAC.

There are a number of versions of the genesis of the badge, the most widely accepted being that it derived from a Trophy of Arms - various swords and bayonets mounted on  a semi-circular display in Victoria Barracks, Melbourne.

The original version worn in South Africa was modified in 1904 and worn by Australian soldiers through two World Wars.

Later changes were made to the style of the crown and the wording on the scroll. The "King's Crown" is the one shown to the left, while arches of the "Queen's Crown" rise at the same angle as the base of the crown, curve at their highest point to a level mid-way on the orb below the cross and then down to below the orb.

In 1949 the scroll was changed to read "Australian Military Forces".

In 1969 the badge was modified to incorporate the 7-pointed Federation Star with a central Queen's crown over the Torse Wreath (a twisted roll of fabric) from the original 1902 version, and the scroll wording changed to "Australia".

In the 75th anniversary year of the the ANZAC landings at Gallipoli, there was a drive to return to traditional accoutrements worn by Australian soldiers during the World Wars, which clearly identify the Australian Army. The Queen's crown returned to its central position and the scroll now reads "The Australian Army'.


Returned From Active Service Badge

The Australian Defence Force Returned From Active Service Badge features a tri-services badge (with an anchor, wings and Rising Sun) surmounted by the King's or Queen's crown of the reigning monarch, with a boomerang underneath with the text 'RETURNED FROM ACTIVE SERVICE' . The reverse of the badge has a pair of pin clips for attachment to the wearer's clothing.

The Returned from Active Service Badge (RASB) is issued to Australian Defence Force personnel who have rendered warlike service. The badge enables individuals to display their involvement in warlike service while wearing civilian attire. It is worn when the wearing of service medals is not appropriate or possible. As the award of the RASB is not governed by statute, it has been the practice of Australian Governments to determine conditions of eligibility for each conflict in accordance with the circumstances existing at the time.

Since 1945, with the award of the Australian Active Service Medal (AASM) 1945-75 and the current AASM, the badge has been awarded automatically. The bronze badge was introduced in 1953, and is identical to the earlier post-Second World War Returned from Active Service badge, apart from the replacement of the King's crown with the Queen's crown.

Anecdotally, the positioning of the lapel buttonhole has led  Australian returned service personnel to state that "nothing is positioned above the Returned from Active Service badge".   The RASB is not worn when medals are worn, as the medals themselves are ample proof of that status.  This also applies to the miniature devices of honours and awards.